Coalition Histories: Opening Remarks

Coalition Histories: Opening Remarks

To begin with a list:

Collaboration Thinking: affect mobilization. communication. communicability. the common world.

Hannah Arendt, Lectures on Kant’s Political Philosophy

Linda Zerilli, Judging a Democratic World-Building Practice

Errejon and Mouffe, Podemos: In the Name of the People

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Readings for Meeting Seven: Coalition Histories

Readings for Meeting Seven: Coalition Histories

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2018

5:30 – 7:30PM

BCNM COMMONS (340 MOFFITT), UC BERKELEY

 

The working group’s final meeting is a culmination of sorts, intended to draw out the constellations we have been collaboratively building all along between the contested and shifting terrains of “the state”, “the global”, and “the public sphere” and the ways in which bodies are represented in (or not) and circulated through (or not) such frameworks. If in December and March we began thinking about coalitions through their cultural and economic formations, then here we finish by out by thinking about them as scenes of protest, which bridge the gaps and fissures between activism and policy-making. What would mean, the final working group discussion asks, to build coalitional literacies—which is also to say: to build languages of coalition? And how might these kinds of literacies open up altogether new channels for imagining?

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Protokoll: Co-operative Models

Protokoll: Co-operative Models

by Megan Hoetger

 

I will keep this short: working together as collectives is complicated. It’s just never not, even when individuals in the collective are conflict avoidant. Being collective is a process of problem solving, which at its base requires really good communication and really good self-reflexivity. It seems nearly impossible. And yet.

The hope of the shared authority structure remains…

 

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Co-operative Models: Opening Remarks

Co-operative Models: Opening Remarks

by Megan Hoetger

[image: Casa Zimbabwe, from Rachel Banning-Lover’s House History, 1966-2009]

I have been excited for this particular meeting since last summer when I was first conceiving of the working group. I research cooperative histories — filmmakers’ cooperative histories to be specific — and for a couple of years now I have been wanting to talk with a group of people inside and outside the arts sectors about co-op structures as an economic formation and, as Berkeley Student Co-op historian Guy Lillian III wrote it 1971, a “life-experience”. Or, as Joel Rane described of Barrington Hall: “I imagined it as possibly the largest family home in the country, possibly the world.”

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Readings for Meeting Six: Co-operative Models

Readings for Meeting Six: Co-operative Models

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2018

6:00 – 8:00PM *PLEASE NOTE THE TIME CHANGE*

BCNM COMMONS (340 MOFFITT), UC BERKELEY

In this second to the last meeting of the working group, we shift gears to consider more directly the relational practices involved in doing collaboration. We have seen the co-operative and the collective appear in various forms over the previous working group meetings: in the business + tech ideas of platform cooperativism discussed in our “Global Networks” meeting last November; and in the collective and communal formations of ‘the public’ that came up across readings for “Public Spheres” in February. From navigating the group dynamics of the collective, to building an equitable and inclusive co-operative model, how does building a framework for ‘the many’ work on the ground?

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Public Spheres: Opening Remarks

Public Spheres: Opening Remarks

by Megan Hoetger

 

On 20. February Jacque Rancière gave a lecture at UC Berkeley.

When speaking about the Occupy Wall Street movement, he slowly and with a self-consciously belabored affect expanded the list of occupations being called for until he reached the slogan/provocation ‘occupy everything.’ The overcrowded lecture hall erupted with laughter—maybe nervous laughter? Perhaps it was a ‘laughing with’ Rancière whose slow, belabored build-up had just ventriloquized the position of someone who laughs off the suggestion of everything. It’s hard to know exactly over what the group was laughing. But they laughed on cue at what seemed to be the punch line to an implicit joke.

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Readings for Meeting Five: Public Spheres

Readings for Meeting Five: Public Spheres

After kicking off the 50th anniversary of ’68 in January, the working group turns to a discussion of what the “public” in phrases like (digital) public sphere, (virtual) public space, (online) public discourse, and (networked) public good, is or might be. As issues of access and equity increasingly expand into new and diverse frames of communication technologies, how and where do classical formulations of “the citizen,” “the public,” and “the nation-state” still offer helpful sight lines for imagining? How and where do they reach their limits? What are we envisioning beyond them? And what can we envision beyond them?

Co-facilitators:
Shannon Jackson [UC Berkeley Associate Vice Chancellor of Arts + Design; Professor in the Departments of Rhetoric and Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies]

Michael Wolfe [UC Davis Director of Scholarly Communications Program]

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